Renowned Surgeons Launch Acoustic Neuroma Program at UC San Diego Health

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Newswise imageUC San Diego Health has expanded its treatment of rare brain tumors by launching a specialized program in the diagnosis and treatment of acoustic neuromas and complex skull base tumors. The new program will be led by Rick Friedman, MD, PhD, and Marc Schwartz, MD, internationally recognized authorities on the effective treatment of these challenging cases. Patients are currently being accepted into the program.

Birthing New Findings

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A team led by Penn Medicine's Mary Regina Boland, PhD, an assistant professor of Informatics in Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, looked at previously documented associations between specific diseases and being born at a certain time of the year, probing deeper to pinpoint the links between them.

Researchers Receive DOD Grant for Implantable Muscle Stimulator

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Newswise imageA team of researchers led by Kath Bogie, DPhil (PhD), a biomedical engineer and associate professor of orthopaedics and biomedical engineering at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and colleagues from Case Western Reserve and other institutions, has received a $1.8M, three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to develop an implantable muscle stimulator for preventing pressure ulcers and deep tissue injuries to the buttocks. These serious medical conditions, which are caused by lying or sitting in one place for long periods of time, can lead to severe pain and infection, even death.

Why These Amish Live Longer and Healthier: An Internal 'Fountain of Youth'

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The first genetic mutation that appears to protect against multiple aspects of biological aging in humans has been discovered in an extended family of Old Order Amish living in the vicinity of Berne, Indiana, report Northwestern Medicine scientists. An experimental "longevity" drug that recreates the effect of the mutation is now being tested in human trials to see if it provides protection against some aging-related illnesses.

A Clean Slate: Engineering the Gut Microbiome with "Good" Bacteria May Help Treat Crohn's Disease

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Penn Medicine researchers have singled out a bacterial enzyme behind an imbalance in the gut microbiome linked to Crohn's disease. The new study, published online this week in Science Translational Medicine, suggests that wiping out a significant portion of the bacteria in the gut microbiome, and then re-introducing a certain type of "good" bacteria that lacks this enzyme, known as urease, may be an effective approach to better treat these diseases.

Wider Sampling of Tumor Tissues May Guide Drug Choice, Improve Outcomes

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Newswise imageBy focusing on genetic variations within a primary tumor, differences between the primary and a metastatic tumor, and additional diversity from tumor DNA in the blood stream, physicians can make better treatment choices for patients with gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma. This study challenges current guidelines and supports evaluation of metastatic lesions and circulating tumor DNA."

After Cooking, Biofortified Corn and Eggs Retain Vital Nutrient Needed to Prevent Blindness

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Fortified and biofortified foods are at the forefront of efforts to combat vitamin A deficiency worldwide. But little is known about what influence processing may have on the retention of vitamin A precursors in these foods. Now in a study appearing in ACS Omega, scientists report that a high percentage of these healthful substances -- in some cases, almost all -- can survive cooking, depending on the preparation method.

Water Baths as Good as Bleach Baths for Treating Eczema

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For patients suffering from eczema (atopic dermatitis), dermatologists will sometimes recommend bleach baths to decrease bacterial infection and reduce symptoms. But a new Northwestern Medicine study found no difference in the effectiveness of a bleach bath compared to regular water baths. In addition, bleach baths can cause stinging and burning of skin, and occasionally even trigger asthma flare-ups in patients.

Eating More Like Our Ancestors Would Improve Human Health

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Newswise imageMalnutrition problems can be traced to poor-quality diets lacking in diversity, a recent phenomenon in evolutionary history, according to a new paper from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis."Earlier diets were highly diverse and nutrient dense, in contrast to modern food systems in which monotonous diets of staple cereals and ultra-processed foods play a more prominent role," wrote Lora Iannotti, associate professor and senior author of the paper, "Genome-nutrition Divergence: Evolving Understanding of the Malnutrition Spectrum," published in the journal Nutrition Reviews.

Sepsis: The Unknown Medical Emergency

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Newswise imageLittle-known sepsis is a medical emergency, a life-threatening condition caused by an overwhelming response by the body to infection. It's a leading cause of in-hospital death, and one of the most expensive conditions for U.S. hospitals. Forty percent of patients diagnosed with severe sepsis die, and half of the survivors suffer from a debilitating condition known as post-sepsis syndrome. Sepsis has also been named the most expensive in-patient cost in American hospitals, according to a study published by the Agency of Healthcare Research Policy. Costs to hospitals in 2014 reached nearly $24 billion.

Researchers Link Western Diet to Vascular Damage and Prediabetes

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Newswise imageCould short-term exposure to the average American diet increase one's risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease? According to a recent study funded by the American Heart Association (AHA), researchers from New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) provide compelling evidence to support this hypothesis.

Hackensack Meridian Health Meridian Health Foundation Celebrates 20th Anniversary Gala at Ellis Island

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Newswise imageHackensack Meridian Health Meridian Health Foundation is pleased to announce its 20th Anniversary Gala, honoring Peter Cancro, founder and CEO of Jersey Mike's Franchise Systems, Inc., will take place on Saturday, November 18 from 6 p.m. - 11:30 p.m. at New Jersey's iconic historical venue, Ellis Island. This signature fundraising event benefits Hackensack Meridian Health's not-for-profit hospitals and community health programs in Monmouth, Ocean and Middlesex counties.

Globus Expands Data Services to Accelerate Secure Cancer Research

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With a $4.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute, the University of Chicago's Globus and leading cancer researchers at University of Chicago Medicine will build new protected cancer research networks that enable collaborations while keeping sensitive health data secure and private.

Worms Reveal Secrets of Aging

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Investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Health System have identified a new molecular pathway that controls lifespan and healthspan in worms and mammals. In a Nature Communications study published today, researchers showed that worms with excess levels of certain proteins lived longer and healthier than normal worms. In addition, mice with excess levels of these proteins demonstrated a delay in blood vessel dysfunction associated with aging. The study has major implications for our understanding of aging and age-associated disorders.

AACC Elects New Leaders to Serve in 2018

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AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to better health through laboratory medicine, is pleased to announce that Carmen L. Wiley, PhD, DABCC, FACB, has been elected to serve on the AACC Board of Directors as president-elect starting in January 2018.

Model Predicts How E. coli Bacteria Adapt Under Stress

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Researchers at UC San Diego have developed a genome-scale model that can accurately predict how E. coli bacteria respond to temperature changes and genetic mutations. The work sheds light on how cells adapt under environmental stress and has applications in precision medicine, where adaptive cell modeling could provide patient-specific treatments for bacterial infections.